And it's in BOTH hives!

Sunday. I urgently wanted to talk to Adam Fuller to get advice about those queen cells. Would he answer the phone on a Sunday? I suppose I could try. I had to do the reversal on the other hive today and it would be best if I did it after talking to him. I waited until what seemed like a decent hour, but all I got was his voice mail. So at about 11:00am I headed out to the bees with all my gear, feeling decidedly anxious. However, when I got there, the bees were only just emerging for the day, and it was a little chilly still, so I decided to put it off until a little later in the day.

 Skunk cabbage flowers are dying back and leaves are shooting up. No longer food for bees.

Skunk cabbage flowers are dying back and leaves are shooting up. No longer food for bees.

 Lots of skunk cabbage popping up.

Lots of skunk cabbage popping up.

 Bees hanging out at the hive entrance now that there is no mouse guard any more.

Bees hanging out at the hive entrance now that there is no mouse guard any more.

This time, it took 2 1/2 hours. A little better, I suppose. Probably because I was not trying to stuff 9 frames into an 8 frame box this time round. I thought I was going to be clever and lift the top box off as one unit, frames and all, so I wouldn't have to take each frame out one at a time. But it would not lift off, try as I might. So out each frame came one at a time. Sigh. The first thing I noticed was those darn queen cells again! This one seemed to have even more than the last one! Argh! When I got to the middle set of frames, I understood why I had not been able to lift the box off. These frames were attached to the top of the frames in the bottom box by a mass of beeswax and what I took to be queen cells. In fact, I had a terrible time getting one of them off and was pulling and yanking as hard as I could for about 10 mins! Got it off in the end. Then when you do that, you have effectively pulled brood cells apart and you see lots of fat white grubs lying there, with worker bees desperately fussing over them. I would normally feel bad for them, but I was in no mood to feel sensitive to a bunch of bees at that moment.

 This is a mass of scraped off beeswax from brood cells (queen cells). You can see a bee grub - shaped like a bee but all white. Normally it would be still within the cell, but now it is exposed.

This is a mass of scraped off beeswax from brood cells (queen cells). You can see a bee grub - shaped like a bee but all white. Normally it would be still within the cell, but now it is exposed.

 You can see lots of brood cells hanging down from this frame.

You can see lots of brood cells hanging down from this frame.

 Looking down into the top hive box after I have removed a few frames. A ton of bees!

Looking down into the top hive box after I have removed a few frames. A ton of bees!

Once again, I managed to level it up, remove the mouse nest under the hive (no mice in residence), put all frames back, reverse top box with bottom box, move feeder from bottom to top box, scrape off extra cells, and completely piss off more and more bees. And of course the darn smoker kept going out every 10 minutes. I also found that the feeder was rather disgusting and smelled funny. So I went and got my extra one from the garage, filled it with sugar syrup, and put that one in instead. "There, take that!" I said, and the bees were rather surprised to find themselves with something so special from me of all people! Then I piled everything back into the cart and staggered back to the house. Where I then had to start making dinner... pant, pant!

 Both hives reversed, leveled, mouse guards removed, and I'm DONE!

Both hives reversed, leveled, mouse guards removed, and I'm DONE!